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TRANSCULTURAL FRIENDSHIP: OUR POLITICAL FUTURE

Chapter One: The Search for a Pragmatic Utopia

Section 1: Introduction

 

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 Greek Folk Dance performed by the Santorini Dancers on May 30, 1998, for the Greek Festival at the St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church, San Jose, California. (Video still by Clif Anderson, Canon XL1)

 

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"Everyone has the right to education." So proclaimed the General Assembly of the United Nations in 1948 (The Universal Declaration of Human Rights, Article 26). This may be considered an answer to the Question, "Who shall be educated?" The same article also addresses the goals of education:

 

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2.       Education shall be directed to the full development of the human personality and to the strengthening of respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms. It shall also promote understandinq, tolerance and friendship among all nations, racial or religious groups, and shall further the activities of the United Nations for the maintenance of peace.

 

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However, the declaration leaves open the question of how one is to be educated. What methods should be chosen?

 

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 This question raises theoretical and philosophical, challenges of the highest order and demands no less than the determination of the best of all futures within humanity's collective control --in other words, a pragmatic utopia. How do we know when we have described a pragmatic utopia. There are two major criteria applicable to the pragmatic aspect -- achievability and stability.

 

 

 

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The Search for a Pragmatic Utopia

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Achievability